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view-master: the movie

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view-master: the movie

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Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #2037
    Larkitect
    Participant

    yes. there are people that think this is a good idea.

    view-master

    if you need a refresher, here’s an old ad.

    the only thing worse would be a movie based on the old asteroids game. but no one would be that stupid, right?

    My essence still senses Bucho's women.

    #23455
    rob
    Participant

    Proof yet again that Hollywood doesn’t know shit.

    I read an interview with Frank Darabont where he turned in a script and the studio head told him, “That’s the most brilliant script I’ve ever read. I couldn’t possibly greenlight it.” When Frank asked why, the head said, “How would I get 14 year-olds into the seats?”

    So with Hollywood right now, they’re looking for two things — recognizable properties and sequels. Warner Bros. is the only major studio out there that really likes to take chances. Speed Racer? Watchmen? They take big chances, and can afford to because of their large “safe” properties, like Harry Potter and Batman. If you remember, The Matrix was also a pretty big risk. I’m definitely not saying that they’re perfect, but they’ve had a pretty good track record.

    To me, it’s all about the studio doing things for their audience. Look at Warner’s other accomplishments — they spearheaded DVD vs. Divx (remember that, the PPV DVD?) They were the only studio that supported both HD-DVD and Blu-Ray. Since Blu-Ray died, they’re the only studio that has offered a “trade-up” program — you got an HD-DVD? For five bucks you can get the Blu-Ray of that title, and you get to keep the HD-DVD. No other studio is doing things like that.

    I know that many, if not most, don’t take a studio into account when they go see a movie, but I do.

    Back to the topic, though — the ViewMaster idea is dumb as hell. Almost as bad as Ridley Scott working on a Monopoly movie. WTF?!?

    #23452
    Version3
    Keymaster

    @rob 40330 wrote:

    Since Blu-Ray died

    I think you meant HD-DVD. Well, they’ve all kinda died really, because of the lack of true mass adoption, but obviously you were talking about the death of the competing format. I think HD-subscription will probably come out the true king here.

    With regard to WB being the only [big] studio taking chances, I’d only partially agree with you examples here. I’d say they are taking some of few changes with big budgets, but that doesn’t necessarily translate to across the board gambles in the name of great filmmaking. I think that they is a good deal of support there in leaving the filmmaking in the hands of the filmmaker in the case of many of these higher-profile (or potentially higher profile) films, and although that’s the way it should be, it could been seen as “risk taking” since none of the other studios really like to see it happen that way. Seems like the Weinsteins are the same way, but I also see that dynamic ever changing.

    On the flip side of that, depending on how you look at it, every studio is taking huge chances right now, but they are only doing it in the name of merchandise-ability. With Speed Racer, I’m really surprised we did not see a Pole Position movie coming out to compete from another studio. Isn’t that standard operating procedure? Any studio exec that greenlights a board game movie based on merchandise potential with no premise, plot or anything but a subject matter is taking a GIANT chance, because I have not met or heard of one person who doesn’t groan at the idea of it all. If that’s not taking chances, I don’t know what the hell is. Monopoly, no matter how well promoted, will have the draw that a Transformers (or even GI Joe for that matter) will. Execs that think toys are the answer are going to find themselves making excuses next movie season… at least I hope they are. I’d love to see some accountability for all of this when the smoke clears.

    Maybe someone just caught a piece of one our old shows out of context and thought we had GREAT ideas. Time to start that Q-Bert movie, and of course… Perfection. If anyone hears of that movie having a green light, I’m getting an attorney that day.

    #23456
    rob
    Participant

    Yeah, I meant “Since Blu-Ray won”. But…Blu-Ray has a better adoption rate than DVD at the same stage in its life (see http://www.videobusiness.com/article/CA6572676.html) — and considering that Broadband is only at a 63% adoption rate, I can’t see that HD subscriptions even coming close to really being a player for a long time. And, I gotta say, HD stuff right now via broadband is pretty damn shitty. For example, FIOS is asking for $5.99 for On Demand HD for a new movie, and since the compression is so high the video looks like shit. I’d much rather (at least, at this stage in the technology) buy a Blu-Ray or go rent one, so the movie actually looks right.

    I think it’s kinda weird that I still follow all of the home-video stuff so closely, since I haven’t been in the business for a long time. But you never know…that might change…soon…

    #23453
    Version3
    Keymaster

    In my opinion, the adoption rate will probably not be a good argument based on the state of consumer spending. Unless the costs of both the televisions AND the players plummet, people don’t have a good reason to make the switch, unless they are/were already interested in the switch to begin with. It’s not as if anyone has announced plans to eventually phase out DVD in favor of Blu-Ray. I totally agree it looks much better. But, people are watching their spending (whether by self-control or forced spending habits) and it’s much easier to shell out $6.00 for a high definition video with shit compression over their existing hardware and infrastructure, than it is to make changes that they just can’t currently justify. While neither are making the huge adoption rate that people pumping money into the technologies have hoped for, I think we are looking at a totally different scenario than we were for DVD adoption. Number one, there are more choices now than there were then. Number two, the current technology (of the masses) DVD has found ways to continue to be relevant. This didn’t really happen with VHS. The only downside that DVD has it quality against it’s competitors (potentially) and instant (well close) in terms of network (be it iTunes type models or PPV) gratification purchases of one of the formats competitors. However, it’s stayed relevant by offering a format that has much more wide adoption rates than it’s predecessor (anyone remember VHS players being in every SUV on the road… of course not) and a price point that is very hard to compete with via killer marketing like Redbox and subscription models like NetFlix and such. I think as people become more familiar with the two, the transition to an online model makes more sense than a higher rent cost model of a superior format. That all assumes we don’t bounce back and all have expendable cash falling out of our eye sockets, and that BR players don’t come down to the sub $100 price point for all applications, as well as better computer adoption.

    That’s just what I think, but I’m not totally in love with the format like you Rob… you loverboy. 🙂

    #23457
    rob
    Participant

    I think you will see sub $100 BR players this year. And you’re right — I think for the most part, DVD’s got a long life yet. Blu-Ray, so far, has been marketed as “the elite”, but I think as prices start to come down, Blu-Ray’s going to just take over home video. I think On Demand stuff has a better chance of cannibalizing DVD sales rather than Blu.

    I say all this, and yet I’m perfectly comfortable with many digital video files that I play on my PS3 — I think we’re really close to having something just take the lead.

    I love Blu, yeah, but I think what really does it for me is the elegance of the PS3. Not only is it totally upgradeable (a lot of the cheaper Blu-Ray players are only able to update to a certain point), but it does everything with such grace. It’s not as elegant as, say, Apple, but it kicks the pants off of the 360 as a “media machine” in my opinion.

    Oh, and I apologize for hijacking this thread — yeah, the ViewMaster movie’s just a butt idea.

    #23458
    Larkitect
    Participant

    @rob 40339 wrote:

    Oh, and I apologize for hijacking this thread — yeah, the ViewMaster movie’s just a butt idea.

    no problem. not much to say on-topic except “dumbest idea ever” so hijack-away. just don’t fly this thread into any buildings…

    forgot to mention that a very young jodie foster (if you’re into that, rob 😉 ) is in the view-master ad.

    My essence still senses Bucho's women.

    #23454
    Version3
    Keymaster

    Rob, I’ll agree with you that there will be a sub-$100 player for the home. The trouble with letting go of a format is that if it’s all over your life (not just in front of the living room set-top) it’s very hard to migrate to another format. Most houses have multiple home players (not 40 or anything, but 2 or more… right?) computers with DVD (not Blu) and even cars with DVD. So the problem that any format is going to face, is that you have more segments to penetrate than DVD had to deal with. It makes it not only a wider front to fight a battle on, but it makes for a less willing consumer base.

    I get it dude, Blu is the poo… but I don’t think a physical format is going to win for a while. Keep in mind, MOST people said the same thing about CD and it’s evolution (there were Mini-Disc proponents for consumer, there were HDCD people all over, and there were DVD audio predictions abound) and that single purchase, or subscription model digital audio would never take the market. Then the iPod. And it was going to be a fad, and it wasn’t going to make a long term impact, and blah blah blah. Well…

    I’m not saying that video is going to be at the same level, because people don’t have the personal relationship with movies that they have with music. However, they are used to the delivery vehicle, the access and the types of devices the technology may allow… I wouldn’t say the consumer market is totally primed, but they seem to have a very firm handle on digital audio media, and on DVD… and [generally] don’t seem to be looking for any revolutions with either other than the two things that Blu is not very likely to soon give [better]: price and convenience.

    I say digital delivery will win. I say I’d much rather dock my iPhone 4 on my computer, on my TV and in my car and have my whole entertainment system (including movies there) in low quality streamed from the house at 7.2MB (max) with it’s high-def heavy compressed video doing further compression scaling for delivery, than to have high definition discs that require physical changing at the house. I also don’t happen to think I’m alone on that one.

    I don’t see fast adoption of either, but I do see other products providing experiences more similar to the digital delivery model than I do the physical delivery model.

    I’m going to digitally delivery this dead horse I’m beating to your house and just go to bed.

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